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Clinical Conference 2012
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SEVENTH ANNUAL CLINICAL CONFERENCE

September 27-28, 2012

The Conference Center at the Maritime Institute
692 Maritime Boulevard Linthicum Heights, MD 21090-1952

Exhibitor Information

Register Online

Hotel Room Reservation Information
Please note that a block of 15 guest rooms are being held for attendees wishing to stay at the Conference Center. Rooms are available Wednesday, September 26 and Thursday, September 27. The single occupancy rate is $130 per night and double occupancy rate is $175 per night. These rates include dinner and breakfast for each night of lodging (no rebate for missed meals). The rates also include complimentary use of the Center’s recreational facilities including indoor pool, fitness center, and game room; parking and shuttle service to and from BWI-Marshall Airport and Amtrak Station; and complimentary local and toll-free telephone calls up to 30 minutes in length.

Please contact the Maritime Center at 410-859-5700 for more information.
HOTEL RESERVATION DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 17, 2012!

 


DAY ONE SCHEDULE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2012
Registration
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Welcome
8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

THURSDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS
8:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Workshop A: Part I
The ABCs of Preparation for the Social Work Supervisor Part 1
Richard Norman, LCSW-C, Chief Executive Officer, The Martin Pollak Project

Employing an ecological systems conceptual framework, this workshop will examine the broad practice contexts, challenges and opportunities of Millennial Social Work Supervision ©.  Participants will be engaged to identify the competencies required for effective supervisory practice as well as ongoing professional development as a supervisor.  Participants will identify an discuss current economic, social and political forces together with the resultant effect on the public which constitute a major aspect of the current social work practice environment.  Like direct social work practice, social work supervision is embedded in and directly influenced by the current social and political realities as well as the broadly defined experience of the public in relation to these “realities.”  The workshop will cover capabilities and skills through to be both relevant and essential particularly in these times, as dramatic socio-economic change factors unleash their powerful effects on institutions, professional social workers and the public.  This seminar is designed for, but not limited to, social workers who wish to meet the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners’ standards to become an approved supervisor of practitioners seeking licensure.
Please note: This workshop is continued in the afternoon session. 


 Workshop B
The Impact of Child Abduction: Considerations for Practitioners
Geoffrey Greif, Ph.D., LCSW-C

This workshop will provide an overview of the issues facing social workers who are helping families where a child has been kidnapped by a parent.  The vast majority of abducted children, estimated at over 200,000 a year according to a nationally representative telephone survey (Hammer, Finkelhor, & Sedlak, 2002), are taken by family members, usually a parent.  These children have often been exposed to a great deal of familial upheaval.  A family abduction usually occurs in the context of parental acrimony culminating in a separation or divorce.  Children of separation and divorce, even those not abducted, are at risk for emotional problems (Potter, 2010).  When high levels of family conflict accompany a parental breakup, the risks for emotional problems may be even greater (Graham – Bermann, Howell, Habarth, Krishnan, Loree & Bermann, 2008).  Wallerstein, Blakeslee, and Lewis (2001) report that 25 years after divorce, almost one-third of the children in their research still experienced problems.  Even though other research on a more representation sample of children of divorce (Hetherington & Kelly, 2002) argues that the long-term impact of divorce is not as great as Wallerstein et al (2001) content, separation or divorce, especially when there is acrimony, continues to be seen as quite disruptive (Lowenstein, 2002).  Using the lens of ambiguous loss (e.g. Boss, 2010), the circumstances that lead to an abduction, the reasons for the abduction, and the impact on the family members both during and after the abduction will be discussed.  Videos of families where abduction have occurred will be shown.  Clinical implications for social work practice will be provided.
Learning Objectives:  (1) Identify why family abductions occur.  (2) Understand the potential impact on all family members from an abduction.  (3) Gain an understanding of clinical implications for working from an individual or a family modality with family members who have been a part of an abduction experience.


Workshop C
The Role of the Mental Health Provider in Treatment Adherence: HIV/AIDS as a Case Study
Presenter: Melissa Sellevaag, LICSW, and So' Nia Gilkey, LCSW-BACS

Many clients are living with chronic illnesses, ranging from diabetes or HIV/AIDS to high blood pressure and mental illness.  The common thread is the need for consistent and successful medication treatment.  The challenges faced by many clients include poverty and limited resources, and lack of access to information or the affects of stigma and discrimination.  However, there are factors known to positively affect medication adherence for chronic illnesses.  These include use of available supports, a means to accommodate one’s daily routine, an understanding the implication of poor adherence, and individualized strategies.  Using HIV/AIDS as a case study, the content will review factors affecting adherence, the role of the mental health provider in adherence, the benefits of harm reduction strategies, and stages of behavior change to identity barriers and steps to adherence.  A holistic practice model will be reviewed as one step towards promoting culturally competent practice with women, their family, and within the broader communities affected by HIV/AIDS.
Learning Objectives: (1) Define adherence and understand the important and challenges of medication adherence.  (2) Assess professional/personal issues in identifying and effectively working with substance using clients with HIV/AIDS and related mental health concerns.  (3) Review key concepts to ensure culturally competent practice and understand the unique role of the mental health care provider in promoting adherence.  (4) Learn how to apply ADHERE, a skill-building model for application of adherence strategies.


Workshop D
Brain Injury – What Every Social Worker Needs to Know
Megan Mayforth; LCSW-C and Erin Walton; LGSW

National and world news has paid increasing attention to individuals in our society sustaining brain injury.  Professional players and children alike are sustaining concussions secondary to sport-related injuries.  Veterans are also returning to our homeland with a higher number of brain injuries than before.  Because brain injuries may occur without any visible wounds it is critical for social workers to gain skills to assess and treat more than 1.7 million individuals impacted by traumatic brain injuries yearly.  Social workers inhabit principles that are applicable to this population.  This course will cover “Brain Injury Basics” for social workers who have no previous experience or training in this field.  While we welcome participation from seasoned practitoners familiar with this topic, this presentation may be especially beneficial for social workers who work in schools, private practice settings, outpatient clinics, and other non-medical settings.  We will review types of brain injuries experienced across the lifespan.
Learning Objectives: (1) Participants will feel more comfortable and confident in their clinical interactions with clients with brain injury.  (2) Participants will increase their knowledge of brain injury.  (3) Participants will gain skills that are useful in working with clients with brain injury.  (4) Participants will increase their knowledge of resources that may be of use to clients with brain injury and their family members.

 


 Workshop E
Tripping Thru the Brain: How Substance Abuse Negatively Affects the Functioning of the Human Brain
Tripping Thru the Body: How Substances of Abuse Affect Organ Systems
Joseph Gagliardi, M.D.

A basic tour through the human brain that discusses the basic functions and structures of the human brain, how alcohol and drug abuse negatively affect those functions and how those alterations may negatively affect a person’s ability to participate in psychotherapy.
Learning Objectives: (1) Discuss the three levels of the brain.  (2) Discuss the basic structure and function of neural receptors and neurons.  (3) Discuss the functions of Dopamine and Serotonin.  (4) Discuss 2 major functions of the Frontal Lobe.  (5) Discuss how alcohol and drug abuse affects the frontal lobe.  (6) Discuss the importance of executive functioning.  (7) Discuss how the changes to the frontal lobe affect an addict’s ability to make decisions and process information.  (8) Discuss the maturation of the adolescent brain and how alcohol and drug abuse impact that process.  (9) Discuss the implications of these changes in terms of a person’s ability to participate in psychotherapy.

A basic overview of the medical complications of substance abuse in order to enhance the clinican’s knowledge and skills in screening for, and explaining to clients, the dangers of continued drug/alcohol abuse.
Learning Objectives: (1) Define: drug use, drug abuse, tolerance, physical dependence, addiction.  (2) Discuss the concept of relapse.  (3) Discuss the classes of abuseable substances.  (4) Discuss at least three symptoms of drug abuse. (5) Discuss how substance abuse/addiction harms the brain.  (6) Discuss how substance abuse/addiction harms the liver.  (7) Discuss how substance abuse harms the heart.  (8) Discuss how substance abuse harms GI, reproductive and renal systems.  (9) Use the basic knowledge of medical complications of drug abuse to assist clients in choosing recovery.


Workshop F
Ethnogeronotology
Gail Spessert, LCSW-C

Cultural competence is a critical component for ethical social work practice.  Using cohort analysis, Ethnogerontology goes beyond cultural competency to recognizing the heterogeneity within each broad ethnic category of people and how psychosocial-spiritual factors impact use of services and adherence to care plans.  Using modules developed by Stanford’s Geriatric Education Center, this workshop will (1) explore the intersections of aging and ethnicity as related to service provision and (2) introduce basic concepts in culturally competent care of elders from diverse ethnic backgrounds.  Due to the increasing diversity of American elders and the heterogeneity of ethnic groups, this workshop will primarily focus on the four principal minority categories: African Americans, Asian and Pacific Islanders, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian/Alaska Natives, and Ethnic Whites while stressing the heterogeneity of each group.
Learning Objectives: (1) Understand the effect of their own cultural background on their attitudes toward health care.  (2) Define major terms used in ethnogerontology.  (3) Describe the factors that affect cross cultural interactions in gerontological care.  (4) Identify major systems of culturally based health beliefs, values, attitudes, and behaviors.  (5) Explain the model of cohort and analysis as a way to understand the historical experiences of various cohorts of elders from diverse ethnic backgrounds.

 Please note: This workshop meets the three-hour ethics requirement of the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners for licensure renewal.


 Keynote Presentation
12:00 p.m. – 12:55 p.m.

Attachment and Emotions in Children and Adults: Implications for the Therapeutic Relationship


Jude Cassidy, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, University of Maryland


THURSDAY LUNCH
1:00 p.m. – 1:55 p.m.
Lunch Provided

THURSDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS
2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. (3 hours)


Workshop A: Part II
The ABCs of Preparation for the Social Work Supervisor Part 2
Richard Norman, LCSW-C, Chief Executive Officer, The Martin Pollak Project

Employing an ecological systems conceptual framework, this workshop will examine the broad practice contexts, challenges and opportunities of Millennial Social Work Supervision ©.  Participants will be engaged to identify the competencies required for effective supervisory practice as well as ongoing professional development as a supervisor.  Participants will identify an discuss current economic, social and political forces together with the resultant effect on the public which constitute a major aspect of the current social work practice environment.  Like direct social work practice, social work supervision is embedded in and directly influenced by the current social and political realities as well as the broadly defined experience of the public in relation to these “realities.”  The workshop will cover capabilities and skills through to be both relevant and essential particularly in these times, as dramatic socio-economic change factors unleash their powerful effects on institutions, professional social workers and the public.  This seminar is designed for, but not limited to, social workers who wish to meet the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners’ standards to become an approved supervisor of practitioners seeking licensure.

Please note: This is continuation of Workshop A from the morning session.


 

Workshop H
Will the DSM-5 be Major Reorganization or Incremental Change: Clinical Social Workers Ethical Preparation for the Future of Diagnosis
Carlton Munson, Ph.D.

Clinical social work professions have a historical connection with psychiatry in the delivery of mental health services, and licensed clinical social workers deliver the majority of mental health services in the United States.  The social work profession has a significant stake in the changes in delivery of mental health services that may accompany the DSM-5 release scheduled for May 2013.  Dr. Munson participated in the clinical trials for the DSM-5, and he will present what clinical social workers need to know in order to ethically prepare for the transition to the new DSM system.  Dr. Munson will review the proposed changes in how diagnoses are recorded and the proposed changes in the organization and content of specific DSM disorders.  There will be a Q &A session.  There has been some misinformation circulated about the DSM-5.  Dr. Munson’s presentation is based on the information that has been made available by the American Pscyhiatric Association (APA) about the DSM-5 and Dr. Munson’s experience participating in the DSM-5 clinical trials.  The actual content of the DSM-5 will not be certain until the changes are approved by the APA Board of Directors and the DSM-5 is published.
Learning Objectives: (1) Acquire understanding of the DSM diagnostic system history and evolution that led to the proposed changes in DSM-5.  (2) Become familiar with the proposed changes in the definition of mental illness.  (3) Learn the proposed changes in how diagnoses are recorded.  (4) Become acquainted with the dimensional cross cutting measures.  (5) Develop awareness of how to ethically prepare for the changes in the DSM-5.  (6) Learn how to access information about proposed changes in the DSM system.  (7)  Become aware of questions about DSM-5 implementation that are unanswered.


Workshop I
Addressing Ethical Dilemmas in an Era of Complex Practice Issues: HIV/AIDS as a Case Study
Presenter: Melissa Sellevaag, LICSW, and So' Nia Gilkey, LCSW-BACS

Scarce resources, confidentiality protections, criminalization laws, end of life issues, reporting requirements, as well as clients’ issues such as homelessness, substance use and abuse, and challenges to adherence to medical treatments, often confront providers with difficult decisions.  All of these issues can raise ethical questions or dilemmas for the practitioner – both at the micros and macro level of practice.  Through the use of case studies “Addressing Ethical Dilemmas in An Era of Complex Practice Issues: HIV/AIDS as a Case Study” seeks to help social workers and allied health and mental health providers to better respond to ethical dilemmas that arise in providing services across fields of practice.  Utilizing a framework for ethical decision making, the workshop explores clinical and systemic issues, as well as individual and institutional attitudes and policies, that impact social work practice.  Using HIV/AIDS case study content, participants identify clinical issues (micro and macro level), guiding principles rooted in social work values, and discuss the intersection of ethics, the law, agency policies, and culturally competent practice.  The workshop is intended for practitioners in both direct services and administrative roles in a variety of practice settings, working with diverse groups of clients/consumers.  Participants are welcome to bring examples of practice issues that may lead to ethical dilemmas.
Learning Objectives: (1) Identify 5 principles involved in making an ethical decision.  (2) Consider ethical dilemmas in terms of the Code of Ethics and the 5 principles.  (3) Understand culturally competent practice throughout the process.  (4) Review a model for addressing ethical issues in social work practice.  (5) Understand the role of consultation and documentation.

Please note: This workshop meets the three-hour ethics requirement of the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners for licensure renewal.


Workshop J
Patient Activation: Empowering the Patient’s Full Participation in Their Treatment
Suzan Swanton, LCSW-C

The need to incorporate meaningful mechanisms for patients to actively collaborate in their health care is a re-occurring theme in quality health care movements.  Patient activation is a process that emphasizes the patient’s role as an active, equal and meaningful member of the treatment team.  This is an evidence-based practice with people with Chronic illness.  Patient-centered care is also considered a hallmark of quality health care, both behavior and physical.  Patient activation puts into action the ethical principles of respect and self-determination.  This workshop will focus on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by staff and patients alike to embrace patient activation as a critical part of care, and programmatic issues to consider when adopting this innovation into clinical services.
Learning Objectives: (1) Understand the rationale for patient activation and the appropriate policies and procedures that need to be in place to realize this evidence-based model of care for chronic illness.  (2) Identify the stages of patient activation and their importance in quality care.  (3) Describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for an effective patient activation program.  (4) Identify specific strategies for empowering and educating patients.


Workshop K
A Comprehensive Overview of Addictions Issues, Including Emerging Drugs of Abuse
Joseph Gagliardi, M.D.

The purpose of this workshop is to provide clinicians with an overview of the various classes of abusable substances, including emerging drugs of abuse, their basic physiology, their desired and undesired effects, signs and symptoms of drug abuse, screening tools for their clinician, the various levels of addiction treatment and community resources.
Part 1: Emerging Drugs of Abuse and Their Physiology
1. Discuss the different classes of substances of abuse.
2. Discuss the basic desired effects of each new drug of abuse
3. Discuss the undesired effects of each new abuseable drug
4. Discuss the medical complications
5. Describe how a client might present when under the influence of a drug.
Part 2: The Chemical and Non-Chemical Treatment of Addictions
1. Discuss the various medicine used to treat addiction
2. Discuss how Antabuse, Naltrexone / Vivitrol, Campral, Methadone, Suboxone works and its role in addictions treatment
3. Discuss the role of acupuncture, exercise and fun, volunteerism, and meditation in addictions treatment
Part 3: Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment
1. Discuss the use of the CAGE, the MAST, the Geriatric MAST and the AUDIT.
2. Discuss how to screen for other drugs of abuse.
3. List four “Red Flags” for possible initiation of substance abuse.
4. Discuss outpatient detoxification
5. Discuss the different levels of addiction treatment
6. List addiction resources available to the clinician and client
7. Discuss relapse.


Workshop L
Aging and Substance Abuse
Michael Fingerhood, M.D.

The prevalence of substance abuse among older adults is rising, largely related to an increase in prescription opiate abuse.  Afflicted patients do not meet any stereotype with many individuals without previous history of substance abuse.  Alcohol abuse also arises as a new problem in older adults, especially with retirement and bereavement.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Learn the prevalence and impact of substance abuse in older adults. 
(2) Learn screening tools and assessment guidelines. 
(3) Gain skill in motivational tools than enable change. 
(4) Learn treatment options for older adults


5:30 - 7:00 Private Practice Committee Meeting -

PLEASE JOIN US...ALL ARE WELCOME!!!
 

Refreshments will be provided!

1.5 CAT 2 CEU's

 

 

 


7:00-9:00 Movie and Discussion
TITLE: The War Within: A Portrait of Virginia Woolf in Film, Lecture, and Discussion

Facilitator: Carlton Munson, Ph.D. Professor, University of Maryland-Baltimore School
of Social Work, Baltimore, Maryland

DESCRIPTION: This year’s movie night is in the form of a film biography of Virginia Woolf. The film, The War Within: A Portrait of Virginia Woolf, is a definitive documentary that includes interviews with Virginia's niece and nephew, Angelica Garnett and Quentin Bell; Vita Sackville-West's son Nigel Nicolson, and Bloomsbury notables like Frances Partridge and poet-novelist Stephen Spender. The people interviewed provide penetrating insights about the biographical and artistic endeavors that went into the writing of Virginia’s best known books (Mrs. Dalloway, Orlando, To the Lighthouse, Jacob’s Room, The Voyage Out, The Waves, and A Room of One’s Own). The film includes video and still photos of key places in Virginia’s life such as the rooms at Cambridge where Virginia gathered material for A Room of One's Own and London, Richmond, Charleston and Monk's House, that are legendary locations in Bloomsbury history. Rare documents, never filmed before, are included. The role of Sigmund Freud in Virginia’s life is briefly covered. There is coverage of Virginia’s chronic mental illness and her own words about her elation, suffering, and suicidal thoughts that led to her death. Dramatic narration of Virginia’s own words about sexual abuse by her stepbrothers is presented. The film itself is an artistic achievement. Dr. Munson will begin the evening with a PowerPoint presentation he has constructed over the years that sets the scene for the film. Dr. Munson’s presentation includes chilling photographs of abuse photographed by Virginia’s sister, Vanessa, that are in limited circulation. The film and Dr. Munson’s presentation place Virginia’s life in political historical context. The film and the presentation offer many insights from Virginia’s life and writings that are relevant to clinical social work today. 
 

Sodas and popcorn provided!!!
2.0 Category 1 CEU's


DAY TWO SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2012

8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
Registration, Continental Breakfast and Networking Time!

FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS

9:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.


Please note: Completion of Workshops A and M, meets the requirements for both supervision and the three-hour ethics requirement of the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners for licensure renewal.


Workshop M: Part I
Advanced Clinical Social Work Supervision Part 1
Carlton Munson, Ph.D.

This advanced clinical supervision seminar, led by Dr. Carlton Munson, focuses on his new conceptualization of supervision as mentoring and monitoring.  Dr. Munson has devoted his career to advancing clinical social practice and supervision, and he has published more on clinical social work than any scholar in the history of clinical social work literature.  In this seminar Dr. Munson will focus on a comprehensive view of clinical supervision for licensure and non-licensure supervision.  Dr. Munson will cover the latest concepts and practices in clinical supervision that are contained in his new book, Contemporary Clinical Social Work Supervision, that was published in August 2012.  The seminar is designed to be interactive as well as having lecture content.  Specific topics are covered are: (1) Review of the first comprehensive code of ethics for clinical social work supervisors developed by Dr. Munson.  (2) Differentiating mentoring and monitoring in clinical supervision.  (3) Dr. Munson’s theory of narrative based clinical supervision that has evolved from his earlier theory of supervision style.  The narrative approach is a practical real-world approach to supervision.  (4) Supervision of diagnostic activity with emphasis on the DSM-V.  Dr. Munson participated in the DSM-V clinical field trials.  The DSM-V is scheduled for release in May 2013, and clinical supervisors will be provided information on how to prepare for transition to the proposed new DSM system.  (5) Coverage of the emerging demands for performance expectations with differentiation of standards of care, practice standards, practice guidelines, best practices, ethics codes, and practice protocols.  (6)  Practical guidelines for meeting ethical mandates and managing stresses of professional functioning in the exploding technological world that is impacting clinical social work practice and supervision practice.  (7) A common sense approach to evidence based practice and supervision with emphasis on the value and limitations of evidence in practice and supervision.  (8) Cultural competency guidelines for large agencies and small practices.  (9) Review of standardized forms for use in supervision including: a supervisor self-assessment form measuring readiness to supervise; a form for assessing supervisee needs and goals; a supervisee self-assessment form for sorting our therapy session struggles; and a scale that measures knowledge of the NASW Code of Ethics.

Please note: If you register for Workshop M it is continued in the afternoon session.


 

Workshop N
Beyond Fear and Mistrust: Dialogue About and With Mental Health Professionals and Minor-Attracted Persons
Russell Dick, LCSW-C and minor attracted participant(s)

Social workers are in the forefront in providing services to minors who have been sexually involved with adults, in the treatment of minor-attracted persons, and in the development of social policies and laws dealing with minor-attracted persons.  Social work has a long history of advocacy on behalf of disadvantaged and stigmatized populations.  Persons who are growing up to realize that they are minor-attracted persons are among the most disadvantaged and stigmatized.  This workshop will enable social workers to better understand the feelings, characteristics, and behaviors of adolescents and adults who experience such attractions through the person stories of minor-attracted persons.  Participants will learn how the current cultural paradigm actually prevents minor-attracted persons from accessing services and resources that could enable them to live safely within the community.  Participants will learn how individual social workers and the profession as a whole can lead the way in reaching out to this population with compassion and hope, in a way that serves the interest of both children and the people who are attracted to them.


Workshop O
Digital Ethics: Risks, Benefits, Boundaries and Safeguards for On-Line Communications with Clients
Marian Mattison, DSW, Associate Professor

As newer forms of electronic communication reshape traditional communication practices, the implications for social work practitioners are wide reaching.  This workshop will address the ethical principles and practices related to digital communications with clients.  Ethical risks to client and worker confidentiality and privacy will be highlighted and clarified.
Learning Objectives: (1) Articulate ways that newer digital communication technologies will potentially impact Social Work privacy/confidentiality standards and practices.  (2) Be alert to the risks, benefits, and controversies related to the changing nature of communication practices by practitioners.  (3) Recognize emerging communication trends/preferences for digital communication across clients of all ages.  (4) Be aware of the changing nature and definitions of “privacy” and the diminished ability to maintain privacy; be alert to the ethical tensions surrounding providers’/clients’ access to personal information via Social Networking sites.  (5) Articulate social workers’ responsibility to develop and make use of explicit informed consent policies that identify the reasonable expectations, limits, and risks to on-line communications with social workers.

Please note: This workshop meets the three-hour ethics requirement of the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners for licensure renewal.


Workshop P
Helping Teenage Parents Thrive, Survive and Deal with Life Challenges
Delores Junious, LCSW-C

The workshop will provide tips on how to establish rapport and build confidence of the teen parent.  Techniques that can be used to motivate resistant clients to complete tasks and set goals will also be identified.  DC TANF benefits, eligibility requirements have changed in DC and the impact on the population will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: (1) Participants will learn 7 keys to collaboration with teen parents.  (2) Participants will develop skills to assist in motivating teens and strengthen their well being.  (3) Participants will learn the 5 pillars of well being.  (4) Participants will be familiar with changes in DC TANF benefits.


Workshop Q
Spirituality as a Resource for Mental Health and Wellness
Catherine Nugent, M.S, LCPC, TEP

Over the past few decades, researchers in diverse fields have begun to study the contribution spirituality can make to physical and mental health.  In this workshop, we will identify ways that spirituality can be a resource for mental health and wellness, as well as how spiritual beliefs can sometimes function as a barrier to mental health.  Participants will have the opportunity to explore their personal understanding of spirituality and how this can be a resource in their work and their lives.  The workshop will be highly interactive and experiential, using action methods to explore the topics discussed.
Learning Objectives: (1) Discuss current research findings regarding the effects of spirituality on mental health problems, including potential positive and negative effects on mental health.  (2) Clarify their own spiritual beliefs and values and identify major influences on their spiritual development.  (3) Identify ways that spiritual beliefs and practices can provide support and strength in their lives and those of their clients.


 

Workshop R
Play Therapy with African American Children
Sonia Hinds, APRN, BC

Cultural competency will be defined and relevant information will be discussed.  Additionally, this workshop will address critical factors that over the years have affected health seeking behaviors in the African American community.  Ten qualities that therapists must have for successful client-centered therapy will also  be discussed in depth.  Participants will observe and practice specific play therapy interventions with African American as well as children of other ethnic groups.
Learning Objectives: (1) Define cultural competency to include relevant facts.  (2) Describe health seeking behaviors among African Americans and factors that have contributed to these behaviors.  (3) Identify 10 qualities needed by the therapist for successful client-centered approach.  (4) Demonstrate specific play therapy interventions with African-American children that may be applied to children of other ethnic groups.


FRIDAY LUNCH PROVIDED
12:15 P.M. – 1:15 P.M.

FRIDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS
1:15 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Workshop M: Part II
Advanced Clinical Social Work Supervision: Part 2
Carlton Munson, Ph.D.

This advanced clinical supervision seminar, led by Dr. Carlton Munson, focuses on his new conceptualization of supervision as mentoring and monitoring.  Dr. Munson has devoted his career to advancing clinical social practice and supervision, and he has published more on clinical social work than any scholar in the history of clinical social work literature.  In this seminar Dr. Munson will focus on a comprehensive view of clinical supervision for licensure and non-licensure supervision.  Dr. Munson will cover the latest concepts and practices in clinical supervision that are contained in his new book, Contemporary Clinical Social Work Supervision, that was published in August 2012.  The seminar is designed to be interactive as well as having lecture content.  Specific topics are covered are: (1) Review of the first comprehensive code of ethics for clinical social work supervisors developed by Dr. Munson.  (2) Differentiating mentoring and monitoring in clinical supervision.  (3) Dr. Munson’s theory of narrative based clinical supervision that has evolved from his earlier theory of supervision style.  The narrative approach is a practical real-world approach to supervision.  (4) Supervision of diagnostic activity with emphasis on the DSM-V.  Dr. Munson participated in the DSM-V clinical field trials.  The DSM-V is scheduled for release in May 2013, and clinical supervisors will be provided information on how to prepare for transition to the proposed new DSM system.  (5) Coverage of the emerging demands for performance expectations with differentiation of standards of care, practice standards, practice guidelines, best practices, ethics codes, and practice protocols.  (6)  Practical guidelines for meeting ethical mandates and managing stresses of professional functioning in the exploding technological world that is impacting clinical social work practice and supervision practice.  (7) A common sense approach to evidence based practice and supervision with emphasis on the value and limitations of evidence in practice and supervision.  (8) Cultural competency guidelines for large agencies and small practices.  (9) Review of standardized forms for use in supervision including: a supervisor self-assessment form measuring readiness to supervise; a form for assessing supervisee needs and goals; a supervisee self-assessment form for sorting our therapy session struggles; and a scale that measures knowledge of the NASW Code of Ethics.

Please note: This is a continuation workshop M from the morning session.


 

Workshop T
Clinical Work with Sexual Offenders
Steve Hartsock, Ph.D., LCSW-C

This workshop will provide the social work clinician a review and discussion of current research on treatment, assessment and relapse prevention for sexual offenders.  Assessment of relapse risk will be featured.  Based on assessment the level, type, scope of intervention will be addressed.  Participants will develop an understanding of the clinical and safety issues inherent with this population. The presenter will use clinical examples from his own practice to illustrate concepts.  Treatment will be viewed as a community wide effort. Social and policy issues will be discussed.  The presentation will be interactive in nature and participants are encouraged to bring questions and concerns for discussion.  From the perspective of community containment it will be argued that the clinical social worker is well trained to provide successful intervention for offenders and their families.
Learning Objectives:
1. Enhance of the understanding of treatment with sexual offenders
2. Develop skills in the treatment of sexual offenders
3. Appreciate the value and efficacy of treatment
4. Application of  clinical social work skills to this population

Relevance to Clinical Social Work:
Clinical Social Workers are involved on a daily basis with clients of all ages who have been victims of sexual abuse.  Sexual abuse frequently causes lifelong problems for victims. The sexual abuser, who is caught, eventually is released into the community.  Prevention of further abuse is essential. Prevention reduces new victims.  Clinical Social Workers who work for prevention do a service to the community and victims alike.  Frequently the Clinical Social Worker must evaluate and make determination about family reunification, child visitation and family relationships.  The social worker is asked to strategize about the best treatment protocol. This workshop will address  these issues.


 Workshop U
Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking: Awareness and Prevention Training for Social Workers
Alicia McDowell, MSW and Melissa Snow

Participants will study the issue of Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking (DMST) and commercial sexual exploitation in order to foster awareness, integrate prevention strategies, and learn how to respond to potential victimization.  Components of the presentation will cover prevalence of the issue within the state of Maryland, risk factors for victimization, impact and involvement of the commercial sex industry, the recruiting process, and trauma bonding associated with trafficked victims.  Participants will learn prevention strategies and how to respond to potential victimization.  In addition, participants will be provided information regarding recent legislation and how it impacts their professional practice.
Learning Objectives:  (1) Overview of DMST: Legislation, Scope of Issue, Vital Statistics, Language and Terms.  (2) Prevention: Risk-Factors involved, Traffickers, Recruiting, Signs of DMST.  (3) Effects of DMST: Display of trauma bonding, impact of DMST trauma.  (4) Response protocol.


Workshop V
Clinical Pragmatism: A New/Old Approach to Ethical Problem Solving
James Forte, Ph.D., MSW

Social workers often face multi-faceted, complex ethical dilemmas and predicaments.  Clinical pragmatism offers an approach to ethical problem solving inspired by John Dewey’s moral philosophy and Jane Addams’ innovative practice that attends to both general ethical guidelines and the details of a case.  The method can increase the attainment of consensus about good outcomes to difficult ethical problems. 
Learning Objectives: (1) Understand the basic assumptions of the clinical pragmatism approach to ethical problem solving.  (2) Identify the six steps of the clinical pragmatism approach to moral inquiry and ethical problem solving.  (3) Develop beginning competency in the use of pragmatic techniques for ethical problem solving including consensus formation, deliberation, dramatic rehearsal, moral imagination, perspective taking, and situational analysis.

 

 Please note: This workshop meets the three-hour ethics requirement of the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners for licensure renewal.

 


 Workshop W
Machismo: Exploring Fact, Fiction, Culture, Mental Health, and Treatment Modalities
Veronica Cruz, LCSW-C

This workshop will discuss and explore the concept of “machismo” from a clinical and systems perspective.  An emphasis will be placed on word origin, cultural elements, mental health and various treatment modalities.  The workshop will provide participants with a general understanding of “machismo” and how to utilize it in a clinical setting to achieve optimal results.  A comparison between western and eastern cultural will be discussed.  This course will explore what is fact and what is fiction.  The presenter is a bicultural, forensic social worker specializing in criminal defense mitigation, dual diagnosis, crisis intervention, addictions, trauma and working with diverse ethnic groups.  This is an interactive workshop where case vignettes will be presented and participants will work in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: (1) Increase their knowledge of machismo and understanding what is fact and what is fiction.  (2) Understand the concept of machismo from a clinical and systems perspective.  (3) Articulate key differences in Western and Eastern cultural and how these differences can be used in a clinical setting.  (4) Participants will be able to articulate essential clinical skills and best treatment modalities for individuals with acute “machismo.”


Workshop X
“Suffering in Silence” – Identification and Effective Treatment of the Self Injurious Adolescent and Young Adult
Joan Goodman, LCSW-C

Self injury has grown in epidemic proportions over the last 15 years.  It has been such a trend that it is now a behavior that has been observed in young students in elementary school.  Self injurious teens are known to be highly treatment resistant, reporting how they are “just fine” after their self injury has been discovered by their parents or school.  This workshop will present to you a full picture of Adolescent Self Injury.  By providing didactic information, as well as evidence based treatment approaches coupled with specific theoretical frameworks, the clinician will learn a “user friendly” guide to follow to learn how to identify treat and self injurious teens even when they don’t want help.  This workshop will use case examples along with art, poetry, and social media to give the workshop attendee an up-close and personal view in real time into the minds of teens who self injure in their “own words.”
Learning Objectives: (1) Identify the warning signs of teens self injury and typical methods used.  (2) Understand the 14 common functions of teen self injury.  (3) Recognize how the typical negative counter-transference reaction clinicians have when treating this “hard to treat” population can be utilized as a tool to enhance your effectiveness.  (4) Review the specific psychological underpinnings that exist for all teens that self injure and use it as your guide in the treatment process.  (5) Learn how to make a proper assessment of self injury and how to ascertain if the teen is acutely suicidal.  (6) Understand when using a “contract” is effective and when it is not.  (7) Review evidence-based treatment approaches combined with specific theoretical frameworks within certain treatment modalities to improve treatment effectiveness for this population.


EXTRA FREE CEU's!!! 
4:15 to 6:00 p.m.  Post-Conference Discussion hosted by the Private Practice Committee

Follow-up Discussion of the Workshop about Minor Attracted Persons and Access to Treatment
Moderated by Sherryl Silberman, LCSW-C and Linda Friskey, LCSW-C
1.5 CEUs
Light Refreshments will be served
 



REGISTRATION

Register Online

Conference Fees:

Early Bird Registration Fees
Registrations must be received in NASW-MD Office by 5:00 on Friday, September 7, 2012

Entire Conference (13 CEU's)
$239.00 for NASW Members
$299.00 for Non-Members

Entire Conference With Thursday Evening Movie and Discussion (15 CEU's, Cat.1 for the same price!)
$239.00 for NASW Members
$299.00 for Non-Members

Thursday Only Early Bird (7 CEU's)
$139.00 for NASW Members
$179.00 for Non-Members

Thursday Only with Evening Movie and Discussion (9 CEU's)
$139.00 for NASW Members
$179.00 for Non-Members

Friday Only Early Bird (6 CEU's)
$139.00 for NASW Members
$179.00 for Non-Members

 

Regular Registration Fees

Entire Conference (13 CEU's)
$349.00 for NASW Members
$419.00 for Non-Members

Entire Conference With Thursday Evening Movie and Discussion (15 CEU's, Cat.1 for the same price!)
$349.00 for NASW Members
$419.00 for Non-Members

Thursday Only Regular Rate (7 CEU's)
$199.00 for NASW Members
$249.00 for Non-Members

Thursday Only with Evening Movie and Discussion (9 CEU's)
$199.00 for NASW Members
$249.00 for Non-Members

Friday Only Regular Rate (6 CEU's)
$199.00 for NASW Members
$249.00 for Non-Members

 

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Calendar

4/26/2014
NASW-MD Chapter Board of Directors Meeting

5/9/2014
MACRO CONFERENCE

5/13/2014
Forensic Social Work Committee

5/14/2014
Executive Committee Meeting