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2015 Annual Clinical Conference
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TENTH ANNUAL CLINICAL CONFERENCE
September 24-25, 2015
The Conference Center 
Maritime Institute of Technology
692 Maritime Boulevard
Linthicum Heights, MD 21090


Exhibitor Information is available on our website at www.nasw-md.org 

REGISTER ONLINE NOW


DAY ONE SCHEDULE
Thursday, September 24, 2015


8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
Registration, Continental Breakfast, and Networking


8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
Welcome to the 10th Annual Clinical Conference

Daphne McClellan, Ph.D., MSW
Christine Garland, MSW
And Introduction of Keynote Speaker

8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Keynote Address
The Public Health in Civil Unrest and Beyond: The Role of Social Work

Leana Wen, M.D., M.Sc. 
Baltimore City Health Commissioner

Dr. Wen will speak about how social work ties into public health during civil unrest and recovery both in Baltimore and the state of Maryland.

THURSDAY MORNING WORKSHOPS
10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Workshop A- Supervision Part I 
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator: A Tool for Administrators and Supervisors to Recognize and Maximize Diversity in the Workplace.

Gisele Ferretto, MSW, LCSW-C
Clinical Instructor, University of Maryland School of Social Work
Synopsis: This workshop will focus on the use of the Myers Briggs Type Indicator as a tool for supervision, leadership development, and team building. It will also include the scoring of the Keirsey Instrument for participants.  
Content covered will include: Overview of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and its relationship to the accomplishment of administrative tasks and teamwork. Will include discussion of effective communication skills, running productive and effective meetings, resolving conflicts, managing various tasks using this model of identifying and celebrating differences.  Creative activities and handouts will be developed and delivered during the presentation of content that will enhance learning by providing opportunities for participants to develop skills and strategies to use the material presented. 
Learning objectives: Upon completion of this workshop, participants will:
1. Explore the role of the supervisor after review of  Kadushin’s  major functions of supervision
2. Identify potential benefits of identifying personal preferences of those they supervise
3. Self-reflect on the dynamics presented when providing supervision for different psychological types
4. Apply the knowledge of psychological type to understand and identify challenges in supervision
5. Identify strategies and develop action plans for those they supervise to enhance performance
*Please Note: This is a two day workshop.  You must register for BOTH days of this workshop
*Please Note: After completing all 12 hours of this workshop, both the Supervision certification hours and the BSWE’s 3 hour ethics requirement will be met.
*Please Note: A workbook will be available for purchase at this workshop.  Please bring an additional $15 (cash or check) to purchase a copy



Workshop B
Integrating SBIRT into Social Work Practice

Anthony Estreet, Ph.D., LCSW-C, LCADC, ACSW
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Morgan State University
Paul Archibald, Dr.PH, LCSW-C, ADS, C-CATODSW
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Morgan State University
Synopsis: Research has demonstrated that the SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment) model is beneficial in assisting healthcare practitioners to identify and assist clients with making connections to Substance Use Disorder (SUD) treatment. This model has shown significant effectiveness in hospital emergency departments and trauma centers with individuals with alcohol-related injuries. The purpose of this training is to provide social work practitioners with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively utilize and implement the SBIRT model into standard social work practice.
Learning objectives: 
Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the background and rationale for conducting SBIRT in a variety of social work settings.
2. Explain how to utilize universal screening procedures and instruments to identify patients engaged in at-risk substance using behaviors.
3. Identify and discuss the essential elements of a brief intervention strategy to motivate patients to change their at-risk behavior and/or seek treatment.
4. Understand the critical steps of implementing evidence-based SBIRT practices.


Workshop C
Pain, Pleasure, and Desire: A Holistic Approach to Female Sexual Dysfunction

Mieke Rivka Sidorsky, LCSW-C
Psychotherapist, Rivka Sidorsky, LLC
Synopsis: This training will introduce therapists to the treatment of female sexual dysfunctions. Approximately 45% of women suffer from a sexual dysfunction during their lifetime, so it is imperative that therapists have the tools necessary to identify this need, diagnose the disorders, and have some idea as to the treatment of the major dysfunctions. The course will cover three important areas of multi-dimensional assessment of female sexual function including: introduction to female sexual response; introduction to the holistic approach to female sexual functioning, diagnostic criteria for the disorders, and introduction to the treatment of desire and pain. Using the diagnostic criteria in DSM-5 and tools for assessment, therapists will review and discuss 2-3 clinical case studies.
Learning objectives:
Upon completion of this workshop participants will:
1.  Learn about three multidimensional areas of assessment of female sexual functioning
2.  Learn the diagnostic criteria for female sexual dysfunctions
3.  Be introduced to the treatment of desire and pain disorders


Workshop D
Ethics and the Vulnerable Older Adult:  Understanding Decision-Making Capacity and the Right to Make Bad Decisions

Jessica Rowe, LCSW-C
Jessica Rowe ElderCare Consulting, LLC
Synopsis: In this course, we will address social work ethics and values related to client self-determination, dignity and worth of person, commitment to clients, informed consent, and clients who lack decision making capacity in the context of working with vulnerable older adults.
Learning Objectives:  Upon completion of this workshop, attendees will be able to:

1. Understand the components of assessing for decision making capacity
2. Assess for risk and capacity to determine appropriate interventions
3. Understand role of power of attorney and guardianship
4. Understand the right to make bad decisions
Please note: This workshop qualifies for the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners’ 3-hour ethics requirement for licensure renewal.


Workshop E
Current Trends in Adolescent Substance Abuse

Corey Beauford, LICSW
President, Inspired Consulting Group
Synopsis: Krokodil, K2, 2C-E, Mojo, Salvia, N-Bomb, Lean, Spice, Molly, Bath Salts, Butt-Chugging, Pharm Parties – sound familiar? Adolescents across the United States are experimenting with newer, more toxic illicit drugs. Drug use can have detrimental effects on an adolescent’s neurological, physical, and emotional development. This interactive training will share prevention and treatment interventions that human service professionals can utilize to address substance abuse with adolescents. We will also examine drug use among high-risk adolescent populations and provide strategies for resolving ethical and moral dilemmas that can arise while providing recovery-based services to adolescents and their families. 
Learning Objectives: As a result of this training, participants will:
1. Be able to verbalize an understanding of relatively newer addictive substances that adolescents are abusing within the United States. 
2. Be able to verbalize an understanding of how substance abuse impacts adolescent brain functioning and development 
3. Understand the correlation between current substance abuse trends and high-risk behaviors among LGBTQ Youth
4. Be able to identify and resolve ethical dilemmas related to providing recovery-based treatment to adolescents 


Workshop F 
Faith Convictions and Communities: Adding Spiritual to the Bio-Psycho Social Assessment

Jim Forte, Ph.D., MSW
Professor, Salisbury University
Synopsis: Symbolic Anthropologists offer a useful theoretical approach to assessing the faith-based convictions and behaviors of members of diverse faith communities. The presenter will demonstrate how practitioners can apply this theoretical approach and use two assessment tools – the spiritual eco-map and the spiritual genogram – to expand their assessment formulation beyond the traditional biological, psychological, and social dimensions
Learning Objectives: 
Upon completion of this workshop, participants will:
1.  Learn about the exemplary models that have contributed to the development of a symbolic anthropological approach to spiritual assessment – Clifford Geertz, an anthropologist and David Hodge, a social worker;
2. Learn an anthropological theoretical foundation focused on “existential crises of meaning, symbols, and rituals” for assessing individual faith convictions and communities of faith.
3. Learn how to use a spiritual eco-map to gather information and formulate an assessment regarding the unit of attention, external/internal systems, connections, and the conceptualization of the environment in relation to focal faith-based concerns.
4. Learn how to use a spiritual genogram to gather information and formulate an assessment regarding the focal person’s historical development of his or her faith convictions with special attention to family influences. 

THURSDAY LUNCH (PROVIDED)
1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.


THURSDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS
1:50 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.


Workshop A- Part II (Continued from the morning session)
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator: A Tool for Administrators and Supervisors to Recognize and Maximize Diversity in the Workplace

Gisele Ferretto, MSW, LCSW-C
Clinical Instructor, University of Maryland School of Social Work
See Workshop A-Part I for full description
*Please Note: This is a two day workshop.  You must register for BOTH days of this workshop
*Please Note: After completing all 12 hours of this workshop, both the Supervision certification hours and the BSWE’s 3 hour ethics requirement will be met.
*Please Note: A workbook will be available for purchase at this workshop.  Please bring an additional $15 (cash or check) to purchase a copy


Workshop G
Clinical Understanding of Different Types of Dementia: Types, Causes, and Treatments

Jennifer Fitzpatrick, LCSW-C
Founder, Jenerations Health Education, Inc.
Synopsis: Alzheimer’s disease is the most well-known type of dementia, but there are many others that impact both older and younger adults.  What can be done to prevent dementia?  How can we help families through the devastating diagnosis?  Join us for this informative and interactive program to further your understanding of the types, treatments, and causes of dementia.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:
1. Name three different causes of dementia.
2. List three best practices for treating Alzheimer’s disease.
3. Identify three reasons why getting a proper diagnosis for dementia is important.


Workshop H
Going Digital: Technical Tools in Private Practice

Dionne Brown-Bushrod, LCSW-C
Owner, Psychotherapist, Prosperity Redefined
Jennifer Klingler, LCSW-C,
Psychotherapist, Private Practice and Clinical Case Manager, Sheppard Pratt Health System
Synopsis: This workshop will introduce clinicians in private practice to resources that will assist to grow and manage their businesses. Very often clinicians feel secure in their expertise in the healing arts and often feel isolated in learning techniques to grow their business. Information is plentiful and heady and the clinician tends to focus more educational efforts on clinical work. This workshop serves as an informational forum to give clinicians information on digital ideas defined to support and grow their business practices. 
Learning Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, participants will:
1. Gain an understanding of how the digital world relates to social work clinical practice
2. Grasp marketing and methods of growing ones digital profile and its translation to increased income.
3. Grow in the knowledge of business acumen.


Workshop I
Ethics for Social Work with Groups

Jim Forte, Ph.D., MSW
Professor, Salisbury State University
Synopsis: The size, complexity group dynamics, and blend of member personalities inherent to helping groups poses difficulties different than those faced by clinicians working with individual clients. In this workshop, we will review the special challenges faced by social workers leading therapeutic, socialization, and growth groups as related to ethical practice. 

We will compare and contrast the ethical standards and best practices recommended by the Association for the Advancement of Social Work with Groups, the Association for Specialists in Group Work, and the American Group Psychotherapy Association.

We will identify common ethical challenges and review guidelines to increase the ethical accountability of the worker and the members in facing these challenges. The following areas will be explored.
1. Informed consent and worker actions to inform members of group purposes, goals, risks, costs, timing, duration, nature of participation, expectations, privacy protections, screening and termination procedures.
2. The limits to confidentiality and methods to increase members’ respect for privacy issues.
3. Worker preparation and core competencies for group practice including the education, training, experience, and supervision necessary to lead groups ethically and effectively.
4. The protection of members from harm and the provision of positive group experiences by the use of careful screening procedures, the involvement of members in goal and program development, the protection of members from threats and coercion, fair and equal treatment of all members, the appropriate use of referrals, and the use of ongoing assessment and evaluation methods to insure that member needs are met.

We will also identify and explore contemporary ethical dilemmas faced by social workers using the group work method and possible solutions to these dilemmas. Such challenges include prejudice and discrimination faced by groups composed of stigmatized and vulnerable populations, dual relationships, privacy issues associated with online groups, and group services for mandated and involuntary clients.

Finally, workshop participants will practice a three-step approach to meeting ethical challenges and resolving ethical dilemmas. First, members will learn to identify the standard for ethical practice appropriate to the practice situation. Second, workshop participants will learn to use critical thinking and their professional wisdom to identify alternative courses of action and their likely consequences for members and significant others. Third, workshop participants will learn to develop a plan with the participation of group members for implementing the preferred ethical course of action. 

Particular attention will be given to the use of mutual aid processes in the helping group to ensure ethical conduct by all participants. Illustrations from the presenter’s thirty years of group work experience, case materials, and research reports on ethical group work practice will be used to enrich the workshop participants’ experiences.
Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this course, participants will:
1. Know the current ethical standards and best practices for “social work with groups” practice. 
2. Identify the common ethical challenges and dilemmas faced by group practitioners and the recommended strategies for dealing with such challenges.
3. Master a three-step strategy for identifying and resolving ethical dilemmas.

Please note: This workshop qualifies for the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners’ 3-hour ethics requirement for licensure renewal.


Workshop J
Clergy Sexual Abuse

Tracye Brewer, LCSW-C, LICSW
Social Work Case Manager, Kaiser Permanente, Washington, DC
Synopsis: This workshop will define the term ‘clergy sexual abuse’ and differentiate this experience from that of an affair.  We will explore the various dynamics that should be considered in identifying the abuse, recognizing the experiences of its victims, understanding how it occurs, and the implications for social work practice.  
Learning Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: 
1. Define clergy sexual abuse
2. Identify the four major imbalances between the religious leader and congregant
3. Recognize the pattern of clergy sexual abuse and how it occurs
4. Recognize the aspects of the victim’s experience
5. Explore ethical considerations when working with the clients who are survivors/coming to terms with their abuse


Workshop K
A Social Worker’s Guide to Divorce Mediation

Donna Duquett, JD
Mediation Office of John Spiegel, JD & Donna Duquette, JD, LLC, Rockville
John Spiegel, JD
Mediation Office of John Spiegel, JD & Donna Duquette, JD, LLC, Rockville
Synopsis: Divorce mediation is a process that every social worker should understand because mediation minimizes the emotional and financial costs of divorce. While litigation often makes divorce worse by escalating family conflict and by imposing huge economic costs on the family, mediation can help couples focus on the real needs of their children, divorce with dignity, and accomplish these tasks in a way that saves time and money. This presentation will inform counselors about (1) the process and benefits of mediation, and (2) about the legal issues of separation and divorce and show how these issues can be thoughtfully addressed through mediation. Participants will learn how to screen appropriate referrals to mediation and how to provide therapeutic support to couples and individuals as they go through the mediation process. The presenters will also provide guidance for social workers interested in becoming professional family mediators.
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn:
1. The process and benefits of mediation
2. How mediation differs from psychotherapy
3. An overview of substantive legal issues connected with separation and divorce
4. How to decide whether to refer separating or divorcing clients to mediation, collaborative law, or adversarial law processes
5. How to provide therapeutic support to clients as they deal with mediators and lawyers
6. How to develop proficiency as a professional mediator.


SKIP THURSDAY EVENING RUSH HOUR AND EARN CEUs! 
5:15 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.


Private Practice Committee Q & A session 
5:15 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.  (Earn 1.5 Category II CEUs)  

Forensics Committee Presentation: Discussing Clinical, Emotional, and Legal Implications of Children Charged as Adults
5:15 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. (Earn 1 Category II CEU)

THURSDAY EVENING MOVIE AND DISCUSSION
7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Earn 2 Additional Category I CEUs!

DAY TWO SCHEDULE
Friday, September 25, 2015


9:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Workshop A- Part III (continued)
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator: A Tool for Administrators and Supervisors to Recognize and Maximize Diversity in the Workplace

Gisele Ferretto, MSW, LCSW-C
Clinical Instructor, University of Maryland School of Social Work
Synopsis: This workshop will focus on the use of the Myers Briggs Type Indicator as a tool for supervision, leadership development, and team building. It will also include the scoring of the Keirsey Instrument for participants.  
Content covered will include: Overview of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and its relationship to the accomplishment of administrative tasks and teamwork. Will include discussion of effective communication skills, running productive and effective meetings, resolving conflicts, managing various tasks using this model of identifying and celebrating differences.  Creative activities and handouts will be developed and delivered during the presentation of content that will enhance learning by providing opportunities for participants to develop skills and strategies to use the material presented. 
Learning objectives: 
Upon completion of this workshop, participants will:
1. Explore the role of the supervisor after review of  Kadushin’s  major functions of supervision
2. Identify potential benefits of identifying personal preferences of those they supervise
3. Self-reflect on the dynamics presented when providing supervision for different psychological types
4. Apply the knowledge of psychological type to understand and identify challenges in supervision
5. Identify strategies and develop action plans for those they supervise to enhance performance
See Workshop A-Part I for full description
*Please Note: This is a two day workshop.  You must register for BOTH days of this workshop
*Please Note: After completing all 12 hours of this workshop, both the Supervision certification hours and the BSWE’s 3 hour ethics requirement will be met.
*Please Note: A workbook will be available for purchase at this workshop.  Please bring an additional $15 (cash or check) to purchase a copy


Workshop L
Compassion Fatigue, Vicarious Traumatization, and Burnout: Minimizing the Professional Hazards of Clinical Practice

Rhegina Sinozich, MSW, LCSW-C 
Psychotherapist in private practice and director/founder of Balloon to the Moon™
Synopsis: Our clients walk into our offices confused, angry, depressed, and/or anxious. Some are suicidal. Some are homicidal. They are in the middle of family tragedies. They have lost loved ones. They have been raped. They have been to war. In short, they are in pain and we spend our days working with a multitude of difficult emotional energies. We hear heartbreaking stories. We are sometimes successful agents of transformation for our clients and sometimes targets of disappointment and rage. Our work is stressful and our ability to manage this stress is paramount if we are to help our clients.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this workshop, participants will:
1. Be able to identify the physical and psychological impact of compassion fatigue and vicarious traumatization on themselves and their clients
2. Learn the warning signs of professional burnout
3. Be able to use at least 3 experiential personal self-care tools to prevent burnout
4. Learn and practice methods to address their and their clients’ stress.


Workshop M
Introduction to Psychopharmacology

Neil Sandson, M.D.
Medical Director, Acute Inpatient Psychiatry Unit, Baltimore VA Medical Center
Synopsis: In the course of this workshop attendees will gain an appreciation for th basics of psychopharmacology. Specifically, they will be oriented to the core pharmacologic properties of the medications that psychiatrists prescribe, especially with regard to desired therapeutic outcomes, side effects, and even drug-drug interactions. Specific drug classes that will be discussed include antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, anxiolytics, and miscellaneous other categories.  There will also be an exploration of how a psychiatrist might choose particular medications for a given patient, what factors might be weighted in the decision, etc. There will be some discussion of how, from a reductionist standpoint, we are all mobilizing ‘somatic’ interventions on or patients’ behalf. By the end, attendees will acquire the information they need to appropriatesly steer their patients toward consideration of psychotropic medications when that seems indicated, as well as learn the importance of a ‘combined’ synergistic approach in the treatment of mental illnesses. 
Learning Objectives: By the end of this workshop, the participant will:
1. Learn when to refer a patient to a psychotropic medication provider.
2. Gain an appreciation for the potential risks and benefits of different classes of psychotropic medications.
3. Gain insights for how to circumvent a patient’s possible resistance to a psychotropic medication trial.


Workshop N
Everybody’s Mad: An Ethical Framework for Understanding and Responding to Anger

Suzanne Cox, LCSW-C, MBA
Team leader, Continuous Care Team, UMMS/WPPC Clinics, Baltimore
Synopsis: Some days it appears that the world has gone mad.  Sensationalized reports of gang violence, school shootings, workplace violence, and riots inundate our news and expressed anger at individuals, groups, and the system permeate social media.  Where does this come from and, more importantly, what can we do about anger both personally and professionally?
This workshop will explore the etiology of anger by examining the impact of personal and social experiences, including trauma, on the individual. The physiology of anger will be explored as will culturally-mediated differences in anger expression.  The ethical challenges in providing effective clinical care when confronted with angry clients, angry co-workers, and angry bosses will be examined. Finally, we will work to develop a personal framework to allow us to respond both ethically and effectively when anger is self-identified.
Learning Objectives:  Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Explore the etiology of anger in self and others.
2. Examine the role of personal experiences, including trauma, and their relationship to difficult feelings.
3. Discuss physical changes and cultural differences in anger expression and its impact on the client(s) and the provider(s) of care.
4. Identify ethical challenges in clinical care produced by angry clients, angry co-workers, and angry bosses
5. Develop a personal framework for responding ethically when anger is identified in oneself.
Please note: This workshop qualifies for the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners’ 3-hour ethics requirement for licensure renewal.


Workshop O
Business Essentials for Social Workers

Bert J. Goldberg, MSW, ACSW
Associate Professor of Professional Practice And Executive Director, Center for Leadership and Management, Rutgers University

Synopsis: “Doing Good” is our job, but sound business practices make it possible for us to be effective. This interactive workshop will give participants the opportunity to explore what kinds of business practices make it possible for us as social workers to enhance our ability to help people in need. Learn about budgeting, transparency, marketing, and the fine art of selling ourselves and our services.
Learning Objectives: By the conclusion of the workshop, participants will have learned how to:
1. Present themselves to potential customers in the most positive light possible.
2. Create meaningful financial statements.
3. Develop elevator speeches.
4. Learn five techniques to enhance your presence in the community

FRIDAY LUNCH (PROVIDED)
12:15 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.


FRIDAY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS
1:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.


Workshop A- Part IV (Continued)
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator: A Tool for Administrators and Supervisors to Recognize and Maximize Diversity in the Workplace

Gisele Ferretto, MSW, LCSW-C
Clinical Instructor, University of Maryland School of Social Work
See Workshop A-Part I for full description
*Please Note: This is a two day workshop.  You must register for BOTH days of this workshop
*Please Note: After completing all 12 hours of this workshop, both the Supervision certification hours and the BSWE’s 3 hour ethics requirement will be met.


Workshop P
Social Media: Youth and Technology

Amy Burzinski, MSW, LISW-S, LCSW-C
Psychotherapist in Private Practice, University Heights, OH

Synopsis: The digital world offers youth a powerful sense of connection and identity- two critical aspects of development. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and more enable youth to say, act and make choices with the click of a mouse. The youth of today have control without restrictions. The digital world is the third parent. We need to not only acknowledge but compete with this third parent. What can we do?
Based on up to date research, this presentation will look at what parents, teachers, and social workers can do to critically engage youth about social media and address poignant questions. Is social media responsible for mean and cruel behavior? What do youth see via social media and how does it impact behavior such as sexting and the choices they make? What do youth themselves identify as support they would want from adults as opposed to what they identify as unsupportive?  How do we compete with the autonomy and unrestrictive nature offered by social media- third parent?
Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this workshop, participants will gain:
1. Increased understanding about the relationship between adolescent development and social media
2. Knowledge about social media and its impact on adolescent behavior and choices 
3. Increased awareness of how to use social media to engage youth
4. Knowledge about what interventions can be used by family and peer groups to provide connection and meaningful relationships with today's generation of youth


Workshop Q
Increasing Client Insight through Experiential Techniques

Mary Raphel, Ph.D, LCSW-C

Synopsis: As a therapist, it is not uncommon to feel that you are stuck or unable to reach a client in the way that greater insight can be gained.  Having a repertoire of experiential tools can be just what you need to increase a client’s perspective and awareness of what may be holding him/her back.  This workshop is designed as an opportunity to become better acquainted with action methods as an effective means of self-exploration and personal growth in addition to traditional “talk” therapy.
Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:
1. Identify the theories underlying experiential therapy.
2. Understand ways that experiential therapy differs from “talk” therapy.
3. Learn to differentiate when and which experiential activity may be beneficial in individual or group therapy.
4. Review specific techniques that can be utilized.


Workshop R

The NASW Code of Ethics and You: Understanding Your Role as a Social Worker

Corey Beauford, LICSW
President, Inspired Consulting Group

Social workers are often confronted with ethical dilemmas in the workplace and the lines between their work lives and personal lives become blurred. Moreover, demands associated with productivity and the reality of working in a fast-paced environment as members of multi-disciplinary teams can also present challenges with respect to adhering to the Code of Ethics. This training will highlight common workplace ethical challenges and provide practical solutions on how to resolve ethical disputes. This training will also discuss the impact that social media has on our ability to function within the parameters of the Code of Ethics. Lastly, we will discuss how biases and personal values, sometimes referred to as counter-transference issues, can affect adherence to established ethical standards. 
Learning Objectives:
Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:
1. Understand the bearing that counter-transference, provider impairment and burnout has on ethical clinical practice.
2.  Verbalize an understanding of dual and multiple relationships and how to avoid conflicts of interests with peers and clients.
3. Demonstrate the ability to effectively resolve common workplace ethical dilemmas with peers and administrators. . 
Please note: This workshop qualifies for the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners’ 3-hour ethics requirement for licensure renewal.


Registration Form
Tenth Annual Fall Clinical Conference
Thursday, September 24 and Friday, September 25, 2015
The Maritime Institute of Technology Conference Center

REGISTER ONLINE NOW

NASW-MD is committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities are able to fully participate.  Please call the office at least 30 days in advance at 410-788-1066
for service accommodations.

Please complete the registration form below and mail with credit card information or your check payable to NASW-Maryland Chapter at 5750 Executive Drive, 
Suite 100, Baltimore, Maryland 21228.  

You may also register online at www.nasw-md.org.

Early Bird Registration Deadline: Sunday, September 13, 2015 at midnight.


Name: __________________________________________________________________

Job Title: _______________________________________________________________

Organization: ___________________________________________________________

Day Phone: _____________________________________________________________

E-Mail: _________________________________________________________________

Address: ________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

NASW Membership # _____________________________________________________

If you are not a member, would you like an application? ____________________

Workshop Selections
Please indicate your first and second choices for each workshop time slot.  All workshops will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. We will attempt to honor each participant’s selection; however, participants will be issued their second choice if the chosen workshop is already full.

Thursday Morning    10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.   ______First Choice   _______Second Choice

Thursday Afternoon   1:50 p.m.-5:00 p.m.   ______ First Choice   ______Second Choice

Friday Morning   9:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.       ______First Choice    ______Second Choice

Friday Afternoon   1:00 p.m.-4:15 p.m.      ______First Choice    ______Second Choice

CONFERENCE FEES

EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION FEES
(Received in NASW-MD office by noon on Monday, September 14, 2015)

_____Entire Conference Early Bird:  $259 NASW Members/$319 Non-Members/Retired Members: $150/ Student Members $120 
(13 CEUs)

_____ Entire Conference With Thursday Evening Movie and Discussion
Note: Movie earns 2 extra CEUs under Category I; Two-day workshops earn 13 total CEUs under Category I---All for the same price!

_____ Thursday Only Early Bird:   $155 NASW Members/$195 Non-Members (7 CEUs) /Retired Members: $75/ Student Members $60

_____Friday Only Early Bird:  $155 NASW Members/$195 Non-Members (6 CEUs) /Retired Members: $75/ Student Members $60

REGULAR REGISTRATION FEES
(Received in NASW-MD office after 5:00 p.m., Monday, September 13, 2015)

_____Entire Conference Regular Rate:  $369 NASW Members/$439 Non-Members 
(13 CEUs) /Retired Members: $150/ Student Members $120

_____Entire Conference with Thursday Evening Movie and Discussion
Movie earns 2 extra CEUs under Category I; Two-day workshops earn 13 total CEUs under Category I---All for the same price!

_____Thursday Only Regular Rate: $209 NASW Members/$269 Non-Members/Retired Members: $75/ Student Members $60  
(7 CEUs)

_____Friday Only Regular Rate: $209 NASW Members/$269 Non-Members (6 CEUs) /Retired Members: $75/ Student Members $60  

PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS ( Note that you may only choose one meeting):
Avoid the rush hour and earn even MORE CEUs by attending one of our committee presentations after your Thursday afternoon workshop! Pizza and sodas will be provided.

1.   I will attend the Private Practice Committee Q & A session on Thursday afternoon from 5:15 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.  (Earn 1.5 Category II CEUs)  
YES______________   NO_____________

OR

2.   I will attend the Forensics Committee presentation: Forensic Hour: The Many Hats of Forensic Social Work  on Thursday afternoon from 5:15 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. (Earn 1 Category II CEU)
YES______________   NO_____________


Total Payment for the Conference: ___________________________


Conference Fee Includes the Following:
All workshops and CEU certificates for the day(s) you registered; continental breakfast and lunch on Thursday and Friday; and the keynote speaker on Thursday morning; Thursday afternoon forensic or private practice committee meetings; and movie and discussion on Thursday night.

Payment Method

Check: $_________

Credit Card:_____MasterCard        ______Visa       

Card Number: _______________________________________________________

Expiration Date: ___________________________________________________

3-digit Security Code: _________________________________

Name as it appears on front of Card: __________________________________________

Signature: _______________________________________________________________

Today’s Date: _____________________________________________________

Comfort Zone Reminder
Although every effort is made to have a comfortable temperature in the meeting rooms, everyone’s comfort level is different.  Please bring a jacket or a sweater
to account for room temperature fluctuations.
Thank you

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